1284 Alpine Street Suite A

Cornelius, Oregon 97113

PH: 503-357-0334

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Customer Feedback

"Hello dennis you rebuilt my 350 back in june and so far it's been so great to me and performs like a charm! I went by your old shop to show you my truck but they told me you had moved. I wish you great success and thanks again!"

Gutierrez Jorge

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FAQ

If your car or truck is burning oil, smoking, making odd noises, leaking fluids, overheating, or showing other tell-tale symptoms, you should get it checked.

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A used car is often an unknown. Is it really any better than your old one? Do you know its inside story? Can you get a good warranty? There are good used cars out there, but remember you can buy a bigger problem than the one you have if you're not careful. Unless your current vehicle's body or chassis is really beyond repair, you should consider replacing the engine.

You're driving along in your vehicle and suddenly a yellow light illuminates on your dash telling you to check or service your engine. If you're like most car owners, you have little idea about what that light is trying to tell you or exactly how you should react.

This is the most misunderstood indicator on your dashboard, the "check engine" light can mean many different things, from a loose gas cap to a seriously misfiring engine.

It doesn't mean you have to pull the car over to the side of the road and call a tow truck. It does mean you should get the car checked out as soon as possible.

Ignore the warning, and you could end up damaging expensive components. It also can be a sign that your car is getting poor fuel economy and emitting higher levels of pollutants.

A rebuilt engine is a step in the right direction, but it is most often only a halfway solution. A rebuilt engine may have had damaged or worn parts changed, but other essential components may remain in "not new" condition. Even rebuilt engines with new bearings, rings, valves, and seals retain many older components, leading to shorter life expectancies for rebuilt engines.

A remanufactured engine is assembled essentially the same way engines are for a new car. The major reusable components are machined, bored, welded , planed, and polished to the highest possible tolerances. Crankshaft, block, and head castings are subjected to precise checks to guarantee their integrity and fit. The remanufactured components are then assembled together with entirely new, factory fresh pistons, rings, bearings, timing components, gaskets, seals, bushings, lifters, oil pump, and more. The engine is then thoroughly tested before it is given to the customer.